Student Learning

Victorian Curriculum

The Victorian Curriculum is a pre- school to Year 10 developmental road map for what every student should learn at school. The curriculum is the common base of knowledge and skills required by students for life-long learning, social development and active and informed citizenship. It includes the Learning Areas for English, Mathematics, Science, The Humanities, The Arts, Health and Physical Education, Languages and Technologies. It also provides a single, complete set of common state-wide standards which schools use to plan student learning programs, assess student progress and report to parents.

At Ruskin Park we teach students to love reading and writing. We achieve this through our Reader’s Workshop and Writer’s Workshop, which both run from Foundation through the Grade 6.

The two workshop models are linked, focusing on one text type at a time. Students learn to write in a genre, by studying the purpose, structure, language and features of this text type in their Reading lessons. By making explicit the links between Reading and Writing, teachers support students to develop a deeper and more holistic understanding of English. At all year levels the Speaking and Listening curriculum is interwoven with Reading and Writing. This takes the form of Literature Circles, Book Clubs, Turn N Talk, sharing time and Author’s Chair as well as debates, recitals and in the Senior School, speech clubs.

The Reader’s Workshop Model involves:

  • A short Opening linking today’s work to prior learning.
  • A 10 minute Mini Lesson explicitly teaching a skill or reading strategy, normally involving modelled reading of a text.
  • 15-20 minutes of Independent Reading where students read ‘Just Right’ books and work on their individual goals.
  • 15-20 minutes of Further Work/Choice Time when students work towards achieving the class goals.
  • A short Debrief where students reflect on their work, often involving sharing with a partner.

Teachers support students by conferring regularly with individual students, setting challenging learning goals and running small reading groups, focused on students’ needs.

Students build their independence as readers, by working towards their goals and setting new, more challenging ones. By having choice in the literature they read, and input into their individual goals, students become lifelong readers, who read for both pleasure and knowledge.

 The Writer’s Workshop Model involves:

  • A short Opening where writing from previous lessons is reviewed.
  • A Modelled Writing lesson where the teacher models how to write in the genre of study, involving students in the selection of ideas, word choices and sentence structures.
  • 30 minutes of Independent Writing time where students write their own texts. Most of the year students will have choice in their topic and genre, and will work towards achieving their individual learning goals. There is an expectation that students will use this time to prepare for their end of unit writing assessment on the studied genre.
  • A Debrief time, when students share their work with a partner and at least one student shares in Author’s Chair. The focus here is on giving and receiving constructive feedback and using it to improve their writing.

During Independent Writing time the teacher confers with students on their progress against their individual and class goals, providing further instruction and support as necessary. The teacher may run short, targeted shared and interactive writing sessions focusing on an identified need.

The Workshop Model is supported by explicit teaching of grammar, punctuation and spelling, which is then incorporated into Shared and Modelled Reading and Writing sessions, ensuring students develop a deep understanding of English.

We conduct targetted Intervention groups across the school. Data is used to support the identification and progress of these students. The staff members conducting the interventions work closely with the members of the year level team/s to ensure that the specific needs of the students are met.

 

 

 

At Ruskin Park Primary School we believe that for students to reach their full potential they require a rich environment that provides them with the support and confidence to undertake new challenges. Such an environment enables the student to connect with others and be valued as a member of a learning community.

When teaching Mathematics we use a variety of teaching strategies to encourage and stimulate student learning and to ensure all students are engaged and progressing in their learning.  Such techniques range from teacher directed activities of explicit and direct instruction, demonstrations and teaching, to student centred exercises of guided discovery, open discussions and open-ended tasks.

We aim to facilitate students with the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions needed in order to use mathematics in a wide range of situations. This involves recognising and understanding the role of mathematics in the world and having the characteristics and capacities to use these skills purposefully.
Mathematics is taught according to the Victorian Curriculum areas of:

  • Number and Algebra
  • Measurement and Geometry
  • Statistics and Probability

We focus upon the development of skills and mindset which will enable students to have the required knowledge, skills and behaviours to take their thinking and understanding to a higher, deeper, more comprehensive level.

Websites

These following websites are useful to assistance children’s mathematical development:

https://au.ixl.com
https://www.funbrain.com/
https://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/maths/
www.coolmath.com
www.worksheetworks.com
www.studyladder.com.au

Science Understanding

Science understanding is evident when a person selects and integrates appropriate science knowledge to explain and predict phenomena, and applies that knowledge to new situations. Science knowledge refers to facts, concepts, principles, laws, theories and models that have been established by scientists over time.

The Science Understanding strand comprises four sub-strands. The content is described by level.

Biological sciences

The biological sciences sub-strand is concerned with understanding living things. The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that: a diverse range of living things have evolved on Earth over hundreds of millions of years; living things are interdependent and interact with each other and their environment; and the form and features of living things are related to the functions that their body systems perform. Through this sub-strand, students investigate living things, including animals, plants, and micro-organisms, and their interdependence and interactions within ecosystems. They explore their life cycles, body systems, structural adaptations and behaviours, how these features aid survival, and how their characteristics are inherited from one generation to the next. Students are introduced to the cell as the basic unit of life and the processes that are central to its function.

Chemical sciences

The chemical sciences sub-strand is concerned with understanding the composition and behaviour of substances. The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that: the chemical and physical properties of substances are determined by their structure at an atomic scale; and that substances change and new substances are produced by rearranging atoms through atomic interactions and energy transfer. In this sub-strand, students classify substances based on their properties, such as solids, liquids and gases, or their composition, such as elements, compounds and mixtures. They explore physical changes such as changes of state and dissolving, and investigate how chemical reactions result in the production of new substances. Students recognise that all substances consist of atoms which can combine to form molecules, and chemical reactions involve atoms being rearranged and recombined to form new substances. They explore the relationship between the way in which atoms are arranged and the properties of substances, and the effect of energy transfers on these arrangements.

Earth and space sciences

The Earth and space sciences sub-strand is concerned with Earth’s dynamic structure and its place in the cosmos. The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that: Earth is part of a solar system that is part of a larger universe; and Earth is subject to change within and on its surface, over a range of timescales as a result of natural processes and human use of resources. Through this sub-strand, students view Earth as part of a solar system, which is part of a galaxy, which is one of many in the universe and explore the immense scales associated with space. They explore how changes on Earth, such as day and night and the seasons relate to Earth’s rotation and its orbit around the sun. Students investigate the processes that result in change to Earth’s surface, recognising that Earth has evolved over 4.5 billion levels and that the effect of some of these processes is only evident when viewed over extremely long timescales. They explore the ways in which humans use resources from the Earth and appreciate the influence of human activity on the surface of the Earth and the atmosphere.

Physical sciences

The physical sciences sub-strand is concerned with understanding the nature of forces and motion, and matter and energy. The two key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that: forces affect the behaviour of objects; and that energy can be transferred and transformed from one form to another. Through this sub-strand students gain an understanding of how an object’s motion (direction, speed and acceleration) is influenced by a range of contact and non-contact forces such as friction, magnetism, gravity and electrostatic forces. They develop an understanding of the concept of energy and how energy transfer is associated with phenomena involving motion, heat, sound, light and electricity. They appreciate that concepts of force, motion, matter and energy apply to systems ranging in scale from atoms to the universe itself.

Inquiry learning is an approach to teaching which is characterised by:

 

 

 

  • asking questions, building on prior knowledge and encouraging students to make their own discoveries
  • finding out information from primary sources to answer generative questions and develop deep conceptual understandings
  • making connections between ideas, learning domains and experiences.
  • Students move through six stages/area of inquiry learning:

Tuning in: providing experiences for the children surrounding the topic. Activities will engage students’ interest, allow students to make personal connections with the topic, and arouse student curiosity.

Preparing: to Find Out/Finding out: At this stage, student knowledge should be established and a focus should be provided for future learning. Activities at this stage should continue to stimulate students’ interest and curiosity, challenge students’ knowledge, beliefs and values and raise questions to explore in the future.

Sorting out: Students are provided with opportunities to process and sort out and represent information and ideas discovered in the previous stage.

Going further/Making connection: Students’ knowledge is extended and challenged and more information is provided to broaden students’ understandings. Teachers help students to draw conclusions about what they have learnt, and provide opportunities for reflection on what has been learnt, and the learning process itself.

Taking action: Students are given opportunities to act upon what they have learnt.

The benefits of using an inquiry approach in each of the programs – (integrated, discipline/subject-based and extended) are significant because this approach:

  • considers the connections across learning areas, as well as the way that individual students learn
  • allows learning to be more relevant, as concepts are learned in context and relate to existing knowledge
  • requires that content is relevant, integrating multiple aspects/concepts simultaneously
  • provides students in secondary schools with an understanding behind vocational training and links schools to the wider community and jobs in the workplace
  • assists in the management of a crowded curriculum as it combines a number of expected outcomes into rich assessment tasks whilst enabling skills to be developed in context and across domains
  • provides students with meaningful links between activities, rather than jumping from ‘subject’ to ‘subject’ with little contextual relevance
  • supports students to become autonomous learners

Resource:

https://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au

Fun for Kids:

https://www.kidsknowit.com/

https://www.kidsastronomy.com/

https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/primary/pages/Default.aspx

Focus on Inquiry PDF

Focus on Inquiry

Foundation

All our new Foundation students are supported to successfully settle into their classes and gain confidence in their new school setting as they explore a range of new learning experiences. During the first term, all Foundation students participate in a unit, which focuses on the concepts of identify and personal self-image. The aim is to develop the student’s confidence so they are willing to take risks and engage in the learning experiences offered. Through games and a range of activities, students gain an understanding of the importance of persistence and are supported to build strong bonds with their peers and teachers.

Foundation Level Programs:

Daily Literacy Program:

Reading: Students are supported in small teaching groups to acquire basic reading skills such as: left to right orientation of text, strategies for reading unfamiliar words, sight words recognition and comprehension.

Writing: Students are immersed in a range of writing activities to explore different genres such as recount, narratives and simple letter writing. During these sessions, teachers model writing strategies and provide a language rich classroom environment. Students have a chance to celebrate their writing daily on the Author’s Chair, where they receive feedback from their peers.

Handwriting: All students are supported to develop their letter and number formations in line with the Victorian Cursive Script.

Spelling Program: A major emphasis is upon developing the student’s ability to recall the name and sound for both upper and lower case letters of the alphabet. Students apply this knowledge when they are writing unfamiliar words.

Phonological Awareness Intervention Program: Students will be involved in a 16 week program which reinforces the initial, final and medial sounds in words and develops their word attack skills.

Daily Mathematics Program:
At the Foundation level we explore Mathematical concepts through the use of hands on concrete materials and connections to real life experiences. The activities offered develop an interest in Mathematics and their ability to problem solve. At the Foundation level we explore Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry and Statistics and Probability.

Inquiry Approach:
Students in the Foundation year are engaged in inquiry units related to the concepts of Identity and Community, Living Things, Design and History. For further details about the Inquiry Approach, click here. 

P.M.P.
This program focuses upon the development of fundamental motor skills such as throwing, catching, jumping and balancing. It builds upon each child’s developing gross motor skills. Parent helpers are encouraged to support the students during P.M.P.

Better Buddies
All Foundation students are partnered with a responsible Year 6 student and each pair works together to complete organised activities on a regular basis. Through this program the children learn the values of: caring for others, friendliness, respect, valuing difference, including others, and responsibility.

Ways you can support your child’s learning at home:

  • Read to and with your child daily, discussing their understanding of the text
  • Talk about the letters, words and numbers your child sees when shopping, on television, in books and on computer screens
  • Encourage your child’s curiosity by asking questions in return
  • Take your child to your local library and choose books together
  • Encourage your child to write for different purposes such as notes, shopping lists and birthday cards
  • Play games with your child to reinforce concepts introduced in the classroom.

Junior School – Years One & Two

This year, the Junior School is home to 5 classes of super learners:

1A   –  Ms Jones

1D   –  Mrs Dickinson

1J   –   Mrs Jinks

2C  –   Miss Clarke

2D  –   Miss Doensen

2E  –   Mrs Edwards

Students in the Junior School build their independence as learners. They learn about the importance of having a Growth Mindset, and to persist at tasks for longer periods of time.

All curriculum is presented in an engaging and structured manner, with lots of opportunities for discussion, collaboration and independent work.

At this level, students become more familiar with the Reader’s and Writer’s Workshops, and learn to identify their strengths and areas for improvement. As they learn to monitor their own progress they become involved with the setting of their individual learning goals, and take more ownership of how they learn.

They learn strategies for solving open ended problems in all curriculum areas, but especially Maths, STEM and Digital Technologies.

By building students’ capacity as learners, we prepare students for lifelong learning, enabling them to succeed at all areas of the curriculum.

Sleepover

One of the highlights of Year 2 is the annual sleepover. The sleepover is an important step for students in preparing for overnight camps in Year 3 and beyond. Held in Term 4, students spend a night away from home, and engage in fun activities with their teachers and friends at school.

Literacy

All classes provide literacy groups to ensure each student is targeted in their zone of proximal development. Literacy groups involve activities such as Guided Reading with the teacher, listening to reading posts, comprehension activities, making role plays, hands on spelling activities, ICT activities and class novel literacy study. Students are provided with rich writing tasks, which relate to real world experiences and are supported in extending their creativity and imagination. << In this photo students were exploring procedural texts by making butter. Students enjoyed tasting the butter with some biscuits after their writing lesson.

Maths

Level 2 teachers endeavour to explore Maths through hands on learning experiences. They explore shapes outside the classroom, maps of the school and community, use water and jugs to explore volume, and use a variety of materials for fractions, length, mass and number. In this photo students were exploring three dimensional shape characteristics. >>

Swimming

Level 2 students participate in water safety and swimming lessons each year. Students are grouped according to their swimming ability and are taught by a team of trained swimming instructors. This is a valuable and enjoyable experience for all our students.

Middle School – Years Three & Four

Our Middle School teachers are:

  • 3C   –  Mrs Cutcliffe
  • 3J   –   Ms Campion
  • 4A   –  Mr Alexander
  • 4C   –  Miss Cochrane
  • 4M   –  Ms McKerrow

Students at this level participate in a number of special learning activities throughout the year such as:

– Swimming Program

– Camping Experience (Both Year 3 & 4)

– BGreat @ Being You Program

Science

Students in level three enjoy learning about science! They learn the process of predicting, observing and analysing what actually happens after an experiment is conducted. The latest experiment included the heat of a candle flame as well as a balloon filled with a little bit of water. What do you think happened?

Sport

Our Year 3 and 4 students compete in a level 3 sport session each week run by the classroom teachers (separate from their specialist run PE class). During this time classes compete in good spirits against each other in a round robin format.

Students are involved in a wide array of physical activities at Ruskin Park Primary School including cross country, athletics, Hooptime basketball, swimming, team and individual sports.

The skills of these activities are appropriately taught to students to support their understanding and development. High priority is placed on teaching appropriate social skills of competing with good sportsmanship.

Senior School – Years Five & Six

The Senior School teachers are:

  • Year 5O       –  Ms O’Halloran
  • Year 5P      –   Mrs Pratley
  • Year 6C      –   Mr Coffin
  • Year 6M      –   Ms Marshall

Senior students are expected to act as role models for the younger children. The students’ voice is highly valued and there are many opportunities throughout the year for students to develop and try out their leadership skills.

All Year 6 students are partnered to mentor a Foundation child as part of the Better Buddies Program. This program aims to develop empathy, responsibility and a caring attitude in a mutually beneficial and positive paired learning partnership.

Year 6 Transition

Year 5 and 6 students will be involved in various transition activities throughout the year. This includes representatives from several schools attending Ruskin Park for information sessions and an excursion to some of the local secondary schools.

The Year 6 students will be expected to complete and submit their Application for Enrolment forms during May 2019 for their choice of secondary school in 2020.

Graduation

In the last week of 2019 the Grade 6 students will be attending their graduation ceremony which will be held at the Dorset Gardens Hotel. Parents and students can mingle in the gardens for photographs before coming inside for an official ceremony. On completion of the ceremony, students say goodbye to their parents and enjoy both a meal and disco together to celebrate the end of their primary school years.

 

STEM/Inquiry Learning

Science

Through the study of Science students can experience the joy of scientific discovery and nurture their natural curiosity about the world around them. In line with the Victorian Curriculum our school Science program explores the concepts related to the following five key learning areas;

Science as Human Endeavour

Through science, students are encouraged to improve their understanding and explanations of the natural world. They are taught that the explanations they develop are based on evidence and scientific knowledge. Their explanations will vary as their scientific understanding evolves. Students are encouraged to consider the ethical and social considerations in relation to science practices and applications.

The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are:

  • an appreciation of the unique nature of science and scientific knowledge, including how current knowledge has developed over time through the actions of many people
  • how science knowledge and applications affect peoples’ lives, including their work, and how science is influenced by society and can be used to inform decisions and actions

Biological Science

In the study of Biological Sciences students investigate living things such as animals, plants and microorganisms.  They explore life-cycles, body systems, physical adaptations and behaviours and how these features aid survival.

The key concepts developed within Biological Sciences are:

  • a diverse range of living things have evolved on Earth over hundreds of millions of years
  • living things are interdependent and interact with each other and their environment
  • the form and features of living things are related to the functions that their body systems perform.

 

Chemical Sciences

In Chemical sciences students classify substances based on their properties such as solids, liquids and gases, or their composition; for example elements, compounds and mixtures. They explore physical changes of state and investigate how chemical reactions can produce new substances.

The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that:

  • chemical and physical properties of substances are determined by their structure at an atomic scale
  • substances change and new substances are produced by rearranging atoms through atomic interactions and energy transfer.

 

Earth and Space Sciences

Earth and space sciences focus upon Earth’s dynamic structure and its place in the cosmos. Students view Earth as part of a solar system, which is part of a galaxy, which is one of many in the universe and explore the immense scales associated with space. They explore how changes on Earth, such as day and night and the seasons relate to Earth’s rotation and its orbit around the sun. Students learn to recognise that Earth has evolved over 4.5 billion years. They explore the ways in which humans use resources from the Earth and appreciate the influence of human activity on the surface of the Earth and the atmosphere.

The key concepts developed within this sub-strand are that:

  • Earth is part of a solar system that is part of a larger universe
  • as a result of natural processes and human use of resources, Earth is subject to change within and on its surface, and over a range of timescales.

 

Physical Sciences

 Incorporated in the key science areas is the development of Science Inquiry skills. Students are given hands on opportunities to develop an ability to;

  • make predictions and formulate questions before and during investigations
  • plan and conduct simple experiments
  • accurately record their observations and the processes involved in Science
  • analyse and evaluate the outcomes of investigations
  • actively share their findings, draw conclusions to demonstrate their understanding of key concepts.

 

 Inquiry Learning

 Inquiry learning is an approach to teaching which is characterised by:

  • asking questions, building on prior knowledge and encouraging students to make their own discoveries
  • finding out information from primary sources to answer generative questions and develop deep conceptual understandings
  • making connections between ideas, learning domains and experiences

Students move through six stages/areas of inquiry learning:

Tuning in: providing experiences for the children surrounding the topic. Activities will engage students’ interest, allow students to make personal connections with the topic, and arouse student curiosity.

Preparing: to Find Out/Finding out: At this stage, student knowledge should be established and a focus should be provided for future learning. Activities at this stage should continue to stimulate students’ interest and curiosity, challenge students’ knowledge, beliefs and values and raise questions to explore in the future.

Sorting out: Students are provided with opportunities to process, sort out and represent information and ideas discovered in the previous stage.

Going further/Making connection: Students’ knowledge is extended and challenged and more information is provided to broaden students’ understandings. Teachers help students to draw conclusions about what they have learnt, and provide opportunities for reflection on what has been learnt, and the learning process itself.

Taking action: Students are given opportunities to act upon what they have learnt.

The benefits of using an inquiry approach in each of the programs – (integrated, discipline/subject-based and extended) are significant because this approach:

  • considers the connections across learning areas, as well as the way that individual students learn
  • allows learning to be more relevant, as concepts are learned in context and relate to existing knowledge
  • requires that content is relevant, integrating multiple aspects/concepts simultaneously
  • assists in the management of a crowded curriculum as it combines a number of expected outcomes into rich assessment tasks whilst enabling skills to be developed in context and across domains
  • provides students with meaningful links between activities, rather than jumping from ‘subject’ to ‘subject’ with little contextual relevance
  • supports students to become autonomous learners.

Resources:

https://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au

Fun for Kids:

https://www.kidsknowit.com/

https://www.kidsastronomy.com/

https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/primary/pages/Default.aspx

Focus on Inquiry PDF

Focus on Inquiry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Technologies

 

The Digital Technologies curriculum enables students to become confident and creative developers of digital solutions through the application of information systems and specific ways of thinking about problem solving. At Ruskin Park Primary School we provide practical opportunities for students to develop confidence and competency in the use of various digital devices across all levels from F-6. Teachers use ICT across multiple learning areas to differentiate, explain, elaborate and explore. Students are being taught to be competent, critical and safe online users; that is, they are able to safely use a variety of ICT devices, programs and applications.

 

Class teachers are providing students with specific training in the use of Google Classroom, developing skills in Google Docs that promotes collaborative learning. Staff at Ruskin Park use Google Drive, specifically Google Docs to collaboratively plan across levels. 

 

Each classroom is equipped with iPads, laptops and either interactive or display TVs. Students engage in digital programming through the use of Beebots, Spheros and drones.

 

Ruskin Park offers students the opportunity to participate in film making with the use of a green screen, various camera equipment including GoPros, digital SLR and movie cameras and video editing software. We are very proud of the film awards that the school has won including the Video Matsuri Award and the ATOM awards. Students are encouraged to extend their film making skills during special school events including camps, excursions and special days. These films are shown during our annual Film Night.

 

 

 

Music

Music Specialist Teacher: Ms Davies

Hello and welcome to the Ruskin Park Primary “Music” page. In Music there are many opportunities for your child to shine, whether this be through exploring our wide range of percussion instruments, dancing and singing or simply being part of the enjoyable musical activities that are taught by our Music specialist. The Music Room is a bright and fun space to be in, where everyone has the opportunity to grow and express themselves freely.

Here at Ruskin Park Primary, we aim to build every student’s confidence and overall success, by developing skills in listening, reading and playing music. Our school has a strong tradition in performing, and we work hard to provide our students with plenty of opportunities to create and make, respond and explore. We run incursions that bring in musicians and performers to enhance musical learning. Every year the whole school takes part in country-wide initiatives such as “Count Us In” and “Harmony Day.” The whole school community works together to produce a concert that shows at Yarra Valley Performing Arts Centre biannually.

Ruskin Park Primary currently runs two choirs, the Senior Choir (3-6) and Junior Choir (P-2), who are kept very busy. We also have a fantastic rock band, run by one of our expert instrumental music teachers from Creative Music. These groups are regularly fulfilling the role of being the school’s ambassadors. All groups give many performances inside and outside of the school and rehearse on a weekly basis throughout the year. They make us very proud.

Creative Music offers instrumental music lessons at RPPS during school time on a wide range of instruments – guitar, piano, drums, voice, saxophone, flute and clarinet.

Instrumental music lessons

Instrumental music lessons are also provided on a variety of instruments from experienced instructors through Creative Music In Schools.

The school values the excellent teaching and support of our two Creative Music teachers Ash and Jim.

Japanese

Brown sensei – Japanese Teacher

All students in the school study Japanese LOTE for one hour a week.

The Foundation students learn mainly cultural Japanese but from Year one to Year six the students are taught to read, write and speak in Japanese.

The students work through ten colour card levels starting at white and working through to black.

We have a strong film-making culture at Ruskin Park, and our students have entered a number of Japanese language film competitions, winning a prize on every occasion.

All our films can be seen on Mr Brown’s YouTube channel at the following link.

Brown Sensei

We also try to motivate and engage students through involving them in events such as Japanese cultural days and Japanese cultural evenings.

Each year we seek to invite a Japanese intern to work with Mr. Brown in our Japanese program.

 

Physical Education

Mr. Lachlan McDonald
Physical Education Specialist Teacher:

Ruskin Park Primary School has a comprehensive Physical Education Program. Some of the features include

  • A weekly Perceptual Motor Program for all Foundation children commencing in Term 2.
  • A swimming program focussing on water safety for Year 1 children through to Year 6. The children visit the Croydon Indoor Aquatic Centre for lessons.
  • The children in Level 4 (Yr 5 & 6) participate in Inter-School sport as part of the schools membership of the Montrose District Primary Schools Sports Association. This provides the opportunity for the children to participate in Athletics, Cross Country, Cricket, Softball, Soccer, Football and Netball.
  • Other programs include Bike Education for our senior students, after school basketball competition, Kelly Sports (a lunch time activity), karate (a lunch time activity) and access to local tennis and athletic facilities.

Art

Art plays an integral role at Ruskin Park Primary School with every student participating in our program. Students experiment with different mediums and tools and are encouraged to build skills and expand their interests in the program, while also being challenged. The experience and activities are based around the Victorian Curriculum making sure our students are making and responding to artworks from a range of cultural and historical contexts.

The curriculum is also based around events and celebrations that take place around our calendar, including our Japanese program. Each year there is a full school exhibition where every student has the opportunity to bring loved ones and share in their artistic achievements. Throughout the year the student’s work will also be exhibited around the school, either in hallways, outside the Art room, or in the school reception area.

Homework Club

To meet the needs of our students who speak English as an Additional Language, we have created a Homework Club which is conducted after school each Thursday afternoon. We have a number of dedicated teaching staff who volunteer their time to support the development and understanding of the English language for these students. This club is open for students from Foundation to Year 6, and incorporates language experiences and individual homework support.

We have been working in partnership with the Centre for Multicultural Youth, who have generously funded this program with the intention of building relationships between non-English speaking families and the school.

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